Lambert Bros. Paving


When it comes to asphalt, we know lots.

   
Lambert Brothers Paving services described
Paving services
Sealcoating services
Crack filling services
Asphalt Maintenance Plan
Lambert Bros references
Customer testimonials
Tips on finding a contractor
Asphalt pavement FAQ
   


"(Lambert Bros. Paving) got here when they said they would get here,
they were in and out in a timely fashion and they did a great job cleaning
up. They left nothing but quality work behind. (Lambert Bros. Paving)
were also very conscious of our golfers playing around them."


Kevin Heise
Springbank Links Golf

 

EDUCATION

Facts You Should Know About Asphalt

Asphalt is not as tough as it looks

How do I best take care of my new asphalt pavement?

Asphalt Fabric Overlay

History of Asphalt

Facts You Should Know About Cracks

Preventive Maintenance Planning

Economics of Sealcoating 1998-2013

 


Facts You Should Know About Asphalt



A good asphalt pavement will not last forever; external factors destroy the asphalt oil that binds it all together. Slowly at first, quickly as time goes on.
As soon as the freshly laid hot asphalt pavement mix begins to cool, so also begins the aging process which will eventually rob the pavement of its life. When oxygen and water, which constantly bathe the pavement, start to combine with the asphaltic binder of the pavement, a chemical change takes place. At first, this process is necessary for the pavement to become hard and firm. Later, if this process is not arrested, a complete deterioration of the asphaltic binder will take place and reduce the pavement to a layer of loose stone. The asphalt binder is essentially what differentiates a gravel road from a paved road.

The destruction rate of an asphalt pavement varies:
Heat & Sunlight will accelerate the deterioration process; salt will act as a catalyst. Water which penetrates the surface can get into the base course to cause trouble, and at the same time start oxidizing the asphaltic binder inside the pavement. A more dense mix will not oxidize as rapidly as a coarse, open pavement. A thicker lift of pavement will keep its life longer than a thin one.
Automobile & truck traffic create the danger of gasoline and oil spillage, which will soften the asphalt and lead to its breakup.

Our cold climate enhances the danger of water being caught in the pavement and freezing. This can break individual pieces of aggregate apart, or it can break out large sections.

Sealcoating the asphalt pavement with Micro Pave 2000, a slurry sealcoat that has been scientifically developed by Lambert Bros. Paving in the laboratory to address western Canada's climatic conditions, can protect the pavement against all these destructive factors.

Lambert Bros. Paving can inspect, evaluate and give a free estimate when you call (403) 287-3252, so call today.

Back to Top


Asphalt is not as tough as it looks

Asphalt pavements such as driveways and parking lots are continually being constructed but unfortunately are not lasting as long as they used to. Many of us remember pavements lasting 15, 20 years or more with little to no maintenance.

This is not the case anymore. Like many things, asphalt too was made better in the past.
The day your asphalt pavement was installed, it began to deteriorate. Just now it happens faster. Just watch the colour fade from rich black to oxidized grey in no time. There are two reasons for this drastic decline in an asphalt lifecycle.

1) Asphalt
Asphalt is not what it used to be. Due to technological advances in the refining process more and more of the high value resins and oils have been extracted.
These resins and oils have a much higher dollar value alone than in asphalt. They can be used in hundreds of products from plastics and synthetic rubbers to perfumes and cosmetics. The asphalt in our roads and parking lots is merely the glue that holds the rocks together. The more they refine from asphalt, the poorer the glue, the poorer the pavement.

We are continuously rebuilding and repairing our roads, parking lots and driveways with asphalt of lower quality, which continues to increase in price.

2) Oxidation
Since the asphalt binder is not of the quality that it was in the past, given this loss of resins, the asphalt is more susceptible to oxidation from the weather, thus accelerating the deterioration process. Oxidation happens when oxygen, in the air and water, chemically attacks the asphalt binder causing it to break down.

Ultra-violet rays from the sun cause further breakdowns of asphalt making it brittle. Calgary's freeze-thaw cycles literally tear asphalt pavements apart from the inside out. A more dense mix of asphalt, and asphalt that has been properly compacted, will not oxidize as rapidly as a coarse, open pavement. A thicker lift of pavement will hold up longer than a thinner one.


Preventive Maintenance Planning is the solution or counter balance to keeping your asphalt up to speed for longer. Neglect your asphalt and it quickly becomes unserviceable and we will not go into what kind of an image that projects. Suffice to say that repairs at that point can be extensive. And expensive. It is much more economical to maintain a pavement properly than to be faced with what is inevitable with neglect. This is true with most things: your health, your car, relationships, your home, etc.


Back to Top



Asphalt Fabric Overlay?

When a parking lot or driveway begins to develop widespread surface cracking due to sub-grade failure, an asphalt geotextile fabric is a reliable alternative to costly excavation and replacement of the cracked and deteriorated asphalt.

Most people have the misconception that asphalt is watertight.
  
It is not, and most asphalt failures arise from water seeping down into the gravel base and weakening the foundation's shear strength. Once this happens, it is not long before surface cracks (alligator or fatigue cracking) appear due to the weight and flexing of the pavement. If the base is wet and soft the asphalt is going to flex more than if the base was dry and solid. As the asphalt ages it loses some of the black oil that keeps it flexible. When it turns grey in color it is more rigid and more prone to cracking, which in turn allows more water to seep in.  

Pavement cracking is the most visible indicator of pavement distress. Simply paving over top of existing asphalt that has cracks in it will not hide those cracks for long. The cracks will reappear in the exact same places, depending on the thickness of the overlay, usually within a year. This phenomenon is termed reflective cracking, the propagation of existing cracks from old or existing pavement into the new overlay.


Reflective and fatigue cracking are two of the most significant factors in pavement deterioration. These cracks begin at the base of the pavement and work up to the surface. It is caused by shear and tensile stresses in the asphalt layer brought about by traffic loads, change in temperature, expansive sub-grade soils, moisture changes, existing crack and joint movements in the underlying pavement. This cracking is bound to happen but these cracks will take much longer to reappear if an asphalt fabric overlay is employed rather than a simple slurry seal or just an asphalt overlay.

The use of a geotextile paving fabric will provide a medium that absorbs the stress related to the old pavement cracking. This system is very effective, unless there is significant vertical or horizontal movement in the cracks (greater than 0.002 inches).

The paving fabric will also create a moisture barrier that will prevent water from passing through cracks, joints, and porous pavement itself, keeping the aggregate base course and foundation intact and strong.


Thermal cracking is another common type of crack caused by actual expansion and contraction, mostly within the top layer of asphalt, such as an overlay. These cracks are unavoidable and will not be prevented by the underlying paving fabric layer. The waterproofing benefits of paving fabric generally remain intact even if thermal cracking occurs. It is still recommended to have all cracks filled with an elastomeric (rubberized) compound.

Long-term field evaluations have shown that the proper use of paving fabrics in asphalt overlays can increase pavements lifecycle by up to 50%.

http://www.mdot.state.ms.us/research/pdf/PavFabr.pdf

Utilizing asphalt fabric overlays will reduce maintenance cost and improve the effectiveness of your management system without the need to reconstruct, provided it is caught in time.

Back to Top


How do I best take care of my new asphalt pavement?


There are a few things you should know about freshly paved driveways and parking lots:

Asphalt needs 48-72 hours to cure depending on the temperature and humidity. It is important to keep people, cars and bikes off the new pavement during that time. Actually, the asphalt will continue to cure for the next 6 to 12 months but you do not have to wait that long to use the new surface.

Since the asphalt will be pliable until it has hardened or fully cured, it is important to avoid the following:
  • Parking your car in the same spot every time.
  • Parking motorcycles and bicycles on the driveway where kickstands can penetrate the surface.
  • Parking a trailer or RV on the pavement without putting a piece of plywood beneath each wheel and trailer hitch to evenly distribute the weight.
Temperature changes will cause the ground to expand and contract causing the pavement to crack. This is the nature of asphalt and is the first step in pavement deterioration. These cracks should not be ignored! They need to be sealed by a professional as soon as possible to prevent water damage and further deterioration of the pavement. To extend the life of your asphalt pavement, it is recommended that you sealcoat the surface approximately 6 months to a year after the paving is completed. Sealcoating will prevent the oxidation and will resist ultraviolet rays and gas/oil spills.
  • Oxidation occurs when the asphalt oil hardens due to exposure to oxygen. This causes cracking allowing oxygen and rainwater to penetrate the surface causing further deterioration of the pavement. Sealcoating will protect the surface from exposure to oxygen and help prevent the surface from cracking.
  • Ultraviolet rays will cause the pavement to crumble by breaking the links between the carbon bonds. The sealcoating will protect the surface from the UV rays and prolong the life of your asphalt pavement.
  • Gasoline and oil spills will penetrate the asphalt causing it to soften. Sealcoating will give you a little more time to get it cleaned up before the damage is done. 
Back to Top


Facts You Should Know About Cracks

A good asphalt pavement seldom wears out; external factors destroy the asphalt oil that binds it all together. Slowly at first, quickly as time goes on.
As soon as the freshly laid hot asphalt pavement mix begins to cool, so also begins the aging process which will eventually rob the pavement of its life. When oxygen and water, which constantly bathe the pavement, start to combine with the asphaltic binder of the pavement, a chemical change takes place. At first, this process is necessary for the pavement to become hard and firm. Later, if this process is not arrested, a complete deterioration of the asphaltic binder will take place and reduce the pavement to a layer of loose stone. The asphalt binder is essentially what differentiates a gravel road from a paved road.

The destruction rate of an asphalt pavement varies:

Heat & Sunlight will accelerate the deterioration process; salt will act as a catalyst. Water which penetrates the surface can get into the base course to cause trouble, and at the same time start oxidizing the asphaltic binder inside the pavement. A more dense mix will not oxidize as rapidly as a coarse, open pavement. A thicker lift of pavement will keep its life longer than a thin one.
Automobile & truck traffic create the danger of gasoline and oil spillage, which will soften the asphalt and lead to its breakup.

Our cold climate enhances the danger of water being caught in the pavement and freezing. This can break individual pieces of aggregate apart, or it can break out large sections.

Back to Top


Preventive Maintenance Planning


 
Asphalt parking lots require yearly checkups. Preventive maintenance is necessary in order to get the most out of your pavement. These decisions on pavement repairs and maintenance generally involve a large amount of money and are unfortunately made with little or no professional knowledge and with little or no data as to how the improvement will perform in the long run.

Lambert Bros. Paving offers pavement evaluations and 5-15 year budget planning free of charge. We will evaluate the condition of the asphalt and work with you and your budget to develop the best plan of attack to (1) get your pavement back up to par or (2) perform the routine preventive maintenance your pavement will need to remain up to par.

When determining the best plan for any pavement we need to ask questions like: Can the pavement be sealcoated? Can it be patched, crackfilled and sealed? Does it need an overlay or total reconstruction starting from the base? Whatever the situation we will be able to assist and provide you with good advice and honest information.

Here are some other things we at Lambert Bros. Paving consider:

A. If pavement repairs are required, to what extent will patching be more beneficial compared to a complete resurfacing of the entire pavement area.

B. If the pavement is dull and rough but still sound, then it may benefit from a slurry sealcoat such as our Micro Pave 2000. This is a very economical solution to aging asphalt given that it is generally 1/5 to the cost of a 1-2 inch asphalt overlay and will last just as long.

C. Any area of the surface that is either "heaved up" or "depressed down" should be completely reconstructed starting from the base.

D. Was the pavement designed for the loads it is carrying? Often a parking lot was paved with two inches of asphalt, which is enough to support cars and light trucks, but not the load garbage trucks and delivery trucks carry. Maybe only those areas used by these heavier trucks will need to be reconstructed to support the heavier load.

E. Has the use of the building the pavement is serving changed? From an auto parts store (light duty loads) to a castings factory (heavy-duty use)? The pavement may need reconstruction.

If it is determined that the pavement is sufficient (may need some repairs) for coating then we will "walk over" the entire surface looking for:

1. BASE PROBLEMS

a. Grade depressions- "Birdbaths", (standing water on the pavement). Water is asphalt's biggest enemy. Standing water will eventually destroy the asphalt in this area. The problem is most commonly caused by frost expansion in the gravel base or in the sub-grade. At a minimum these areas should be dug up and full depth patched. The long-term solution is to resurface the area so there is not any standing water.

b. Dumpster areas: If the pavement has failed because these areas were under designed, the pavement should be reconstructed from the base up.

c. Water seeping up through the crack (on a dry day): This may indicate a drainage problem under the pavement. Do not fill these cracks with any type of crackfiller or sealer. It would be a waste of time and money.

2. CRACKS

All pavement failure starts with a crack. Asphalt cracking is caused primarily by the effects of sun and moisture and ground movements. Once the crack is open, moisture is able to reach the pavement's subsurface and soften it, or freeze and expand it. Soon the pavement begins to deteriorate around the crack, creating a larger problem. Proper attention to the cracks will prevent the problems from spreading and double the life of the pavement. Treating the problem while it is still small will pay big dividends later by delaying costly resurfacing.

a. Minor cracks: Less than 3/8 inch wide are routed to provide a reservoir for our hot applied elastomeric sealant.

b. Structural cracks: Cracks usually wider than 1/2 inch that extend from one edge of the surface to the other. All cracks wider than one half (1/2) inch but less than one (1) inch should be cleaned and filled with hot applied elastomeric crack sealant.

c. Big Cracks: Cracks wider than one (1) inch should be patched with hot mix asphalt.

3. PAVEMENT SURFACE PROBLEMS

a. Raveling or very porous asphalt: Stones have come out of the surface or the surface has a very "rough" texture. If the asphalt is not sealed, it will degrade rapidly. In severe cases an overlay may be required.

b. Alligatored areas: Interconnecting cracks forming a series of blocks resembling an alligator's skin. This problem is usually caused by not maintaining the asphalt or a base failure problem. The problem areas should be removed and full depth patched.

c. Oil spots: Prior to coating these areas, (if the asphalt under them is sound, use the blade of a knife or thin screwdriver to check this out) prime them with a water based, acrylic oil spot primer.

d. Grass growing onto the edge of the asphalt: Before coating or Crack Filling the grass must be removed.

e. Old or badly dried out asphalt: Pavement that is usually several years old that has never been coated and has a dull gray appearance should be cleaned and rejuvenated with two or three coats of Micro Pave 2000.

f. Special Cleaning Problems: Deposited mud, tree sap, berry stains, etc. must be scrubbed off the asphalt for the coating to adhere properly. An acrylic oil spot primer should be applied prior to coating.

g. Previously coated asphalt: If the asphalt has been coated before with refined coal tar emulsion, or asphalt emulsion sealer, use of Micro Pave 2000 should not cause problems provided the sealer has not cracked. If the sealer has cracked, then sealing over it may not prevent the cracks from resurfacing.

Back to Top
Home | About | Services | Paving | Sealcoating | Crack Filling | Photos | FAQ | Tips | Articles | Testimonials
Contact Calgary | Contact Bonnyville | Contact Northern AB | Site Map


Copyright © Lambert Bros. Paving 2005. All Rights Reserved. Site developed by
WebworX.ca
Home FAQ Contact
Home FAQ Contact